Dec 31, 2015

NIFTY SENSEX INDIAN STOCK MARKET PREDICTION IN 2016

NIFTY SENSEX INDIAN STOCK MARKET PREDICTION IN 2016
INDIAN STOCK MARKET NIFTY INTRADAY CALLS
INTRADAY STOCK TIPS NSE BSE

WHERE IS NIFTY TARGET IN 2016
TO KNOW VISIT WWW.MEGHAINVESTMENTS.COM AND FILL CONTACT FORM

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Nov 29, 2015

40 Books Recommended for investors to read

"You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them” — Ray Bradbury
Below is the list of all the books seen in the chart, as well as a few more that I couldn’t fit. I’m sure I left out a few, but if you’re looking for books on investing, this is a good place to start.

  1. “Reminiscences of a Stock Operator” — Edwin Lefevre, 1923
  2. “Security Analysis” — Benjamin Graham, David Dodd, 1934
  3. “Where Are the Customers’ Yachts?” — Fred Schwed Jr., 1940
  4. “The Intelligent Investor” — Benjamin Graham, 1949
  5. “The Great Crash, 1929” — John Kenneth Galbraith, 1954
  6. “Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits” — Philip A. Fisher, 1958
  7. “The Money Game” — George Goodman, 1967
  8. “A Random Walk Down Wall Street” — Burton Malkiel, 1973
  9. “Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises” — Charles Kindleberger, 1978
  10. “The Alchemy of Finance” — George Soros, 1987
  11. “Market Wizards” — Jack Schwager, 1989
  12. “Liar’s Poker” — Michael Lewis, 1989
  13. “101 Years on Wall Street, an Investor’s Almanac” — John Dennis Brown, 1991
  14. “Beating The Street” — Peter Lynch, 1993
  15. “Stocks for the Long Run” — Jeremy Siegel, 1994
  16. “What Works on Wall Street” — James O’Shaughnessy, 1997
  17. “The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America” — Lawrence Cunningham, 1997
  18. “Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk” — Peter Bernstein, 1998
  19. “Common Sense on Mutual Funds” — Jack Bogle, 1999
  20. “Devil Take the Hindmost: A History of Financial Speculation” — Edward Chancellor, 1999
  21. “When Genius Failed” — Roger Lowenstein, 2000
  22. “One Up On Wall Street” — Peter Lynch, 2000
  23. “Fooled By Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets” — Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2001
  24. “Confessions of a Street Addict” — Jim Cramer, 2002
  25. “The Four Pillars of Investing: Lessons for Building a Winning Portfolio” — William Bernstein, 2002
  26. “Winning the Loser’s Game” — Charles Ellis, 2002
  27. “Bull: A History of Boom and Bust 1982-2004” — Maggie Mahar, 2004
  28. “Poor Charlie’s Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger” — Peter Kaufman, 2005
  29. “All About Asset Allocation” — Rick Ferri, 2006
  30. “Your Money and Your Brain” — Jason Zweig, 2007
  31. “Bailout Nation” — Barry Ritholtz, 2009
  32. “The Big Short” — Michael Lewis, 2010
  33. “The Quants” — Scott Patterson, 2010
  34. “More Money Than God” — Sebastian Mallaby, 2010
  35. “The Most Important Thing” — Howard Marks, 2011
  36. “Backstage Wall Street” — Josh Brown, 2012
  37. “Quantitative Value” — Wesley Gray, Tobias Carlisle, 2012
  38. “Millennial Money: How Young Investors Can Build a Fortune” — Patrick O’Shaughnessy, 2014
  39. “A Wealth of Common Sense: Why Simplicity Trumps Complexity in Any Investment Plan” — Ben Carlson, 2015

Nov 11, 2015

Paul Tudor Jones’ 22 Trading Principles

Paul Tudor Jones’ 22 Trading Principles

  1. It is possible to see that a market is dramatically overbought and prepare for, and then capture, huge gains after the sell off.
  2. Risk small amounts to make big profits.
  3. Bet against times when numerous leaders must agree.
  4. Long hours and a strong work ethic are keys to being a successful trader.
  5. While it is good to trade any market that will turn a profit, specializing in a market can lead to great success.
  6. The markets go down faster than they go up.
  7. If the market will not go down during bad news, it will likely go higher.
  8. The stock market moves in patterns and in cycles. Past price patterns repeat themselves due to human emotions.
  9. Many times traders think a big position order size means that a whale knows something, most times they do not. 
  10. It is okay to skip a trade if you can’t get your entry price.
  11. A momentum move does not just stop, it takes time to roll over.
  12. It is possible to trade successfully by gaming the actions of other traders.
  13. Be aggressive at high probability moments.
  14. Always stay in control of your trading and manage risk.
  15. Focus on risk management as the #1 priority in trading.
  16. Having the right mindset during a big loss that it is just temporary, is the key to coming back and being successful.
  17. Letting profits run is sometimes a great plan.
  18. Being long at all time highs in the indexes is a great strategy.
  19. Great money managers trade with passion.
  20. Even Market Wizards have doubts about winning when entering a trade. 
  21. When the top in a market is reached,  there is a lot of money to be  made shorting as panic selling sets in. 
  22. Guys from Tennessee can trade!

Posted on 5:13:00 PM | Categories:

World Debt Map

World Debt Map


Posted on 4:37:00 PM | Categories:

Jul 27, 2015

The Future Of Currency Trading I Interesting Figures In World Forex Markets I What You Must Know About Global Currency Markets

The Future Of Currency Trading I Interesting Figures In World Forex Markets I What You Must Know About Global Currency Markets

The foreign exchange market of the future is likely to be bigger, more tightly regulated and more diverse—in terms of currencies traded, the range of market participants, and the technology and strategies applied.

Larger volumes will reflect not only continuing economic growth and greater interconnectedness, but also forex's increasing importance as an asset class. The big banks and hedge funds will become less dominant, as new entrants with different aims and trading strategies enter the market.
Indeed, there are many reasons to believe that the era of the big, high-risk position trader will end. One is the relentless rise of algorithmic, or automated, trading: in 2004, these accounted for just 2% of all trades; this year, for the first time, they surpassed 50%.
Then there are the new types of trader. "The globalization of investment, with insurance and pension funds now major investors in international capital markets, has led to the diversification of entities that regularly turn to the forex market," says Professor Mark Taylor, dean of Warwick Business School in the U.K

"The market is becoming more fragmented with new players coming in, sometimes from unexpected sectors," says Michael Kitson, an economist at the University of Cambridge Judge Business School in the U.K. These include forex-focused mutuals and exchange-traded funds, which may be the vanguard of a host of alternative mass-market investment products. There is also a growing army of independent retail investors, especially in Asia and the Far East. Mr. Kitson believes that greater competition and market fragmentation will help create a more level playing field.
However, the greatest impact on forex markets may be new legislation, such as Dodd-Frank, EMIR and Basel III. Dodd-Frank's so-called Volker Clause, for example, aims to separate high-risk activities, such as derivatives trading, from retail and commercial banking, effectively restricting proprietary trading by banks (i.e. banks trading with their own money). "A fundamental reason for the volatility is the diminished role of the banks as 'market makers' due to the ban on proprietary trading," comments Patrick Teng, founder and chief dealer of Six Capital. He notes that "banks have started to play broker and the role of proprietary trading is now being taken over by independent entrepreneurial firms (such as Six Capital), banks spinning off independent units or even by hedge funds."
"Clearly, dealers are cutting down on proprietary trading," says Chiara Banti, lecturer in finance at the University of Essex in the U.K., although this may also be because Basel III exacerbates banks' funding constraints. And while dire predictions of disruptive new regulations have not yet materialized, the most likely impact of greater transparency will be narrower spreads. "Restrictions on proprietary trading must have reduced liquidity, so the banks are offloading their orders elsewhere in the market," Prof. Taylor says.
Tighter regulation to prevent rate rigging—for which more than $9 billion of fines have so far been imposed—will make it easier to press charges against individual traders and their managers. However, some regulators are moving faster than others. "The plethora of new financial regulations are not being internationally coordinated," says Mr. Kitson.
Another major effect of new regulation is that banks will execute client orders at the daily fix electronically, eliminating the human element and reinforcing the trend towards algorithmic or automated trading.  
Dr. Banti notes that "regulation makes trading more expensive, while low bid-ask spreads renders market-making less profitable. As a result, there is less proprietary trading and a decline in the liquidity provided by dealers."
As to what will be traded, Mr. Kitson expects, "a more diverse pool of currencies, including the yuan and the rupee, to eventually join the main currency pairs traded, as these economies are large and growing faster than the U.S. or Europe."
The very structure of the market is changing. Prof. Taylor foresees a shift from the present "oligopoly" of banks, whose market makers and trading platforms are widely used by other players, towards a multilateral forex market. "The emergence of new players will depend very much on developments in technology and trading platforms," he says.
"Thinking small and looking for ways to aggregate success consistently is the way to create substantial profits and regenerate liquidity," Mr. Teng says.

Jul 4, 2015

NIFTY DAILY CHART....NIFTY IN 2015..INDIAN STOCK MARKET 2015 PREDICTION...NIFTY FUTURE TRADING CALLS

NIFTY DAILY CHART....NIFTY IN 2015..INDIAN STOCK MARKET 2015 PREDICTION...NIFTY FUTURE TRADING CALLS...

BELOW IS NIFTY DAILY CHART AS ON TODAY...
WE HAVE GIVEN VERY SIMPLE AND BRIEF OVERVIEW OF ANALYSIS ON CHART 
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Mar 9, 2015

NIFTY WEEKLY CHART

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Jan 13, 2015

Seven characteristics of an objective Trader BY Mark Douglas, Author of The Disciplined Trader

Seven characteristics of an objective Trader BY Mark Douglas, Author of The Disciplined Trader


1.      You feel no pressure to do anything.

2.      You have no feeling of fear.

3.      You feel no sense of rejection.

4.      There is no right or wrong.

5.      You recognize that this is what the market is telling me, this is what I do.

6.      You can observe the market from the perspective as if you were not in a position,
7.      even where you are.

8.      You are not focused on money, but on the structure of the market.