Nov 29, 2015

40 Books Recommended for investors to read

"You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them” — Ray Bradbury
Below is the list of all the books seen in the chart, as well as a few more that I couldn’t fit. I’m sure I left out a few, but if you’re looking for books on investing, this is a good place to start.

  1. “Reminiscences of a Stock Operator” — Edwin Lefevre, 1923
  2. “Security Analysis” — Benjamin Graham, David Dodd, 1934
  3. “Where Are the Customers’ Yachts?” — Fred Schwed Jr., 1940
  4. “The Intelligent Investor” — Benjamin Graham, 1949
  5. “The Great Crash, 1929” — John Kenneth Galbraith, 1954
  6. “Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits” — Philip A. Fisher, 1958
  7. “The Money Game” — George Goodman, 1967
  8. “A Random Walk Down Wall Street” — Burton Malkiel, 1973
  9. “Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises” — Charles Kindleberger, 1978
  10. “The Alchemy of Finance” — George Soros, 1987
  11. “Market Wizards” — Jack Schwager, 1989
  12. “Liar’s Poker” — Michael Lewis, 1989
  13. “101 Years on Wall Street, an Investor’s Almanac” — John Dennis Brown, 1991
  14. “Beating The Street” — Peter Lynch, 1993
  15. “Stocks for the Long Run” — Jeremy Siegel, 1994
  16. “What Works on Wall Street” — James O’Shaughnessy, 1997
  17. “The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America” — Lawrence Cunningham, 1997
  18. “Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk” — Peter Bernstein, 1998
  19. “Common Sense on Mutual Funds” — Jack Bogle, 1999
  20. “Devil Take the Hindmost: A History of Financial Speculation” — Edward Chancellor, 1999
  21. “When Genius Failed” — Roger Lowenstein, 2000
  22. “One Up On Wall Street” — Peter Lynch, 2000
  23. “Fooled By Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets” — Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2001
  24. “Confessions of a Street Addict” — Jim Cramer, 2002
  25. “The Four Pillars of Investing: Lessons for Building a Winning Portfolio” — William Bernstein, 2002
  26. “Winning the Loser’s Game” — Charles Ellis, 2002
  27. “Bull: A History of Boom and Bust 1982-2004” — Maggie Mahar, 2004
  28. “Poor Charlie’s Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger” — Peter Kaufman, 2005
  29. “All About Asset Allocation” — Rick Ferri, 2006
  30. “Your Money and Your Brain” — Jason Zweig, 2007
  31. “Bailout Nation” — Barry Ritholtz, 2009
  32. “The Big Short” — Michael Lewis, 2010
  33. “The Quants” — Scott Patterson, 2010
  34. “More Money Than God” — Sebastian Mallaby, 2010
  35. “The Most Important Thing” — Howard Marks, 2011
  36. “Backstage Wall Street” — Josh Brown, 2012
  37. “Quantitative Value” — Wesley Gray, Tobias Carlisle, 2012
  38. “Millennial Money: How Young Investors Can Build a Fortune” — Patrick O’Shaughnessy, 2014
  39. “A Wealth of Common Sense: Why Simplicity Trumps Complexity in Any Investment Plan” — Ben Carlson, 2015

Nov 11, 2015

Paul Tudor Jones’ 22 Trading Principles

Paul Tudor Jones’ 22 Trading Principles

  1. It is possible to see that a market is dramatically overbought and prepare for, and then capture, huge gains after the sell off.
  2. Risk small amounts to make big profits.
  3. Bet against times when numerous leaders must agree.
  4. Long hours and a strong work ethic are keys to being a successful trader.
  5. While it is good to trade any market that will turn a profit, specializing in a market can lead to great success.
  6. The markets go down faster than they go up.
  7. If the market will not go down during bad news, it will likely go higher.
  8. The stock market moves in patterns and in cycles. Past price patterns repeat themselves due to human emotions.
  9. Many times traders think a big position order size means that a whale knows something, most times they do not. 
  10. It is okay to skip a trade if you can’t get your entry price.
  11. A momentum move does not just stop, it takes time to roll over.
  12. It is possible to trade successfully by gaming the actions of other traders.
  13. Be aggressive at high probability moments.
  14. Always stay in control of your trading and manage risk.
  15. Focus on risk management as the #1 priority in trading.
  16. Having the right mindset during a big loss that it is just temporary, is the key to coming back and being successful.
  17. Letting profits run is sometimes a great plan.
  18. Being long at all time highs in the indexes is a great strategy.
  19. Great money managers trade with passion.
  20. Even Market Wizards have doubts about winning when entering a trade. 
  21. When the top in a market is reached,  there is a lot of money to be  made shorting as panic selling sets in. 
  22. Guys from Tennessee can trade!

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World Debt Map

World Debt Map


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